Study

How are you coping during the COVID-19 Pandemic?

Please participate in our follow-up survey on the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on mental well-being! It only takes 15min!

Watch the video for a preliminary summary of the data

And a pre-print publication can be accessed here:

medRxiv/2020/182980

Why are studies like this one important?

WHY?

We might all have the suspicion that the current state of emergency, with its uncertainties and the additional stress is impacting our mental and physical health – we might feel that everyone is worrying more, is more anxious, maybe less hopeful, or we might have heard more friends complain about headaches or sickness. But is that really the case?

We need this kind of research to provide empirical data to either confirm or reject our suspicions. We need facts! Only with facts we can detect and solve potential problems. This research is necessary in order to shape future regulations and inform intervention services tailored to assist people vulnerable for mental disorders during a state of emergency like the one we are currently facing.

Who we are

Dr Franziska Knolle

Cognitive Neuroscientist, Department of Neuroradiology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technical University Munich (TUM), Munich, Germany. Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK.

Franziska Knolle is a clinical neuroscientist at TUM. She trained in linguistic and neuroscience at the Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Science, Leipzig, and conducted postdoctoral research at the University of Cambridge. She was recently awarded a prestigious EU Marie Skłodowska -Curie Horizon 2020 research fellowship. Her goal is to develop improved methods for early identification of at-risk individuals.

Dr Graham Murray

Clinical Neuroscientist, Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge; and Psychiatrist, Cambridgeshire and Peterborough NHS Foundation Trust, Cambridge, UK.

Graham Murray is a consultant psychiatrist in the UK NHS and a University Lecturer and researcher at University of Cambridge, where he leads a research group. He studied as an undergraduate at the University of Oxford and King’s College London, and as a postgraduate at the University of Cambridge, UK and the University of Oulu, Finland. He researches the causes, mechanisms and treatments of mental illness.

%d bloggers like this: